Understanding Gambling Mechanisms & Predictors 2016 – Conference presentations

The Alberta Gambling Research Institute has posted the presentation slides from their 15th annual conference, which took place April 7-9 2016. From AGRI’s website:

Conference Learning Objectives

By the end of the Alberta Gambling Research Institute’s Annual Conference, participants will:

  1. Understand current research on the mechanisms behind gambling, problem gambling and recovery from problem gambling
  2. Garner knowledge of the scope of gambling-related research, locally, nationally and internationally
  3. Engage in discussion of issues with speakers and other participants regarding gambling, problem gambling and recovery from gambling
  4. Have the opportunity to showcase their research findings

Presentation themes ranged from updates on the latest research on neurobiological and cognitive mechanisms that underlie gambling and problem gambling to presentations on how different treatment and self-help interventions work. Plenary presentations from top experts provided the stimulus for structured conversation sessions that allowed participants to discuss issues in depth. Participants also had the opportunity to showcase their recent research findings. See Conference 2016 Program.

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The relationship between gambling attitudes, involvement, and problems in adolescence: Examining the moderating role of coping strategies and parenting styles

Several factors are associated with an increased risk of adolescent problem gambling, including positive gambling attitudes, higher levels of gambling involvement, ineffective coping strategies and unhelpful parenting practices. It is less clear, however, how these factors interact or influence each other in the development of problem gambling behavior during adolescence. The aim of the current study was to simultaneously explore these predictors, with a particular focus on the extent to which coping skills and parenting styles may moderate the expected association between gambling involvement and gambling problems…

Source: Dixon, R. W., Youssef, G. J., Hasking, P., Yücel, M., Jackson, A. C., & Dowling, N. A. (n.d.). The relationship between gambling attitudes, involvement, and problems in adolescence: Examining the moderating role of coping strategies and parenting styles. Addictive Behaviors. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.02.011

Why are Some Games More Addictive than Others: The Effects of Timing and Payoff on Perseverance in a Slot Machine Game – Open Access

Manipulating different behavioral characteristics of gambling games can potentially affect the extent to which individuals persevere at gambling, and their transition to problematic behaviors. This has potential impact for mobile gambling technologies and responsible gambling interventions. Two laboratory models pertinent to this are the partial reinforcement extinction effect (PREE) and the trial spacing effect. Both of these might speed up or delay the acquisition and extinction of conditioned behavior. We report an experiment that manipulated the rate of reinforcement and inter trial interval (ITI) on a simulated slot machine where participants were given the choice between gambling and skipping on each trial, before perseverative gambling was measured in extinction, followed by measurements of the illusion of control, depression and impulsivity. We hypothesized that longer ITI’s in conjunction with the low rates of reinforcement observed in gambling would lead to greater perseverance. We further hypothesized, given that timing is known to be important in displaying illusory control and potentially in persevering in gambling, that prior exposure to longer intervals might affect illusions of control.

Source: James, R. J. E., O’Malley, C., & Tunney, R. J. (2016). Why are Some Games More Addictive than Others: The Effects of Timing and Payoff on Perseverance in a Slot Machine Game. Frontiers in Psychology, 7. http://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00046

Problem Gambling and Sub-dimensions of Impulsivity among Regular Online Poker Players | Open Access

Introduction: Impulsivity is a personality dimension known to be closely linked to addictive behaviour, including problem gambling. The aim of the present study is to assess impulsivity and its sub-dimensions (non-planning, attentional and motor impulsivity) among a sample of regular poker players, in order to determine whether these subtypes are linked to problem gambling and its severity…

Source: S, B., & C, B. (2015). Problem Gambling and Sub-dimensions of Impulsivity among Regular Online Poker Players. Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy, 06(04). http://doi.org/10.4172/2155-6105.1000254

Loss-Chasing, Alexithymia, and Impulsivity in a Gambling Task: Alexithymia as a Precursor to Loss-Chasing Behavior When Gambling | Open Access

Objective: To examine the relationship between loss-chasing, the propensity to continue gambling to recover from losses, alexithymia, a personality trait associated poor emotional processing and impulsivity, the tendency to act quickly without reflection or consideration of the consequences…

Source: Bibby, P. A. (2016). Loss-Chasing, Alexithymia, and Impulsivity in a Gambling Task: Alexithymia as a Precursor to Loss-Chasing Behavior When Gambling. Cognition, 3. http://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00003

Gambling Fallacies: What are They and How are They Best Measured? | Open Access

Gambling fallacies are believed to be etiologically related to the development of problem gambling. However, this evidence is tenuous due to the lack of consensus on which things constitute gambling fallacies and the adequacy of instruments that ostensibly measure them. The purpose of this paper is to comprehensively identify the main gambling fallacies and examine the reliability and validity of the instruments designed to measure them…

Source: Leonard, C. A., & Williams, R. J. (2015). Gambling Fallacies: What are They and How are They Best Measured? Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy, 06(04). http://doi.org/10.4172/2155-6105.1000256

Suboptimal Foraging Behavior: A New Perspective on Gambling

Addicott, M. A., Pearson, J. M., Kaiser, N., Platt, M. L., & Joseph, F. (2015). Suboptimal Foraging Behavior: A New Perspective on Gambling. Behavioral Neuroscience, No Pagination Specified. http://doi.org/10.1037/bne0000082

Why do people gamble? Conventional views hold that gambling may be motivated by irrational beliefs, risk-seeking, impulsive temperament, or dysfunction within the same reward circuitry affected by drugs of abuse. An alternate, unexplored perspective is that gambling is an extension of natural foraging behavior to a financial environment. However, when these foraging algorithms are applied to stochastic gambling outcomes, undesirable results may occur…

via PsycNET – Display Record.