Pilot study of problem gambling in specialized substance use disorder treatment—High lifetime prevalence of problem gambling in opioid maintenance treatment patients [open access article]

Håkansson, Anders & Ek, Johanna. (2018). Open Journal of Psychiatry, 8, 233–243. doi: 10.4236/ojpsych.2018.83020

Abstract: Problem gambling is over-represented in patients treated for substance use disorders, but substance-specific prevalence of problem gambling is rarely reported. In specialized addiction treatment facilities for opioid maintenance treatment and for alcohol and prescription drug dependence, respectively, 129 patients were screened for problem gambling using the NODS-CLiP. The lifetime prevalence of problem gambling was markedly higher in opioid maintenance treatment (61 percent) than in alcohol and prescription drug dependence treatment (11 percent, p < 0.001). When controlling for gender and age, problem gambling remained significantly associated with opioid maintenance treatment. The present study demonstrated a very high prevalence of lifetime problem gambling in opioid maintenance treatment patients. This calls for active screening for problem gambling in substance use disorder patients, and mainly in treatment for opioid dependence. Read full article

Advertisements

Gambling disorder in male violent offenders in the prison system: psychiatric and substance-related comorbidity [open access article]

Widinghoff, C., Berge, J., Wallinius, M. et al. (2018). Journal of Gambling Studies. doi: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10899-018-9785-8

Gambling disorder is an addiction that can cause major suffering, and some populations seem to be more vulnerable than others. Offender populations have a remarkably high prevalence of gambling problems and they are also over-represented in a number of diagnoses related to gambling disorder, like substance use disorders and antisocial personality disorder. Yet, there are few studies investigating gambling disorder prevalence and related psychiatric comorbidity in this group. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of, and association between, gambling disorder and other psychiatric diagnoses in a sample of young, male violent offenders. Two hundred and sixty-four male offenders, all serving sentences for violent crimes (recruited between 2010 and 2012) participated in this study and went through comprehensive psychiatric evaluation, including assessment for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition criteria. Sixteen percent of the participants met criteria for gambling disorder. Antisocial personality disorder, cannabis, cocaine and anabolic steroids abuse were significantly more common among participants with gambling disorder. The gambling disorder group also showed significantly lower educational attainment. Cocaine abuse and failure to graduate elementary and middle school in expected time were independently associated with gambling disorder in a regression analysis. This study confirms the previously described high prevalence of gambling disorder in offenders. The psychiatric comorbidity was high and the problems had started early, with lower educational attainment in the gambling disorder group. The findings stress the importance of increased awareness of gambling problems among convicted offenders and of gambling research on young people with delinquent behavior. There is a need of more research to investigate this further, in order to develop preventive strategies and treatment. Access full article

The Economic Burden of Pathological Gambling and Co-occurring Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders

By Rodriguez-Monguio, R., Brand, E., & Volberg, R.

Abstract: Objectives: Disordered gambling often co-occurs with psychiatric and substance use disorders. The study aim was to assess the healthcare costs of pathological gambling (PG) and co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders by payer. This is the first-of-its-kind economic analysis of addictive behaviors and mental health disorders.
Methods: Study data were derived from the Massachusetts All-Payer Claims Data-a representative health claims database-for the period 2009 to 2013. The study analytical sample contained all medical and pharmaceutical claims for commercially insured Massachusetts residents who were aged >=18 years, had health insurance coverage, had a diagnosis of PG, and sought care in the Commonwealth. Healthcare cost components included outpatient, inpatient, emergency room visits, and prescription drugs. Bootstrap analysis was performed to account for skewed distribution of cost data. All costs were adjusted to constant dollars.
Results: The study sample included 599 patients over the study period. The most prevalent principal diagnoses were disorders of impulse control (50%), episodic mood disorders (31%), anxiety disorders (14%), and psychoactive substance (9%). The mean annual total expenditures on health care per patient with diagnosis of pathological gambling were $7993 +/- $11,847 (bias-corrected 95% confidence interval) in 2009, $10,054 +/- $14,555 in 2010, $9093 +/- $13,422 in 2011, and $9523 +/- $14,505 in 2012. Pharmaceutical expenditures represented 16% to 22% of total healthcare expenditures. In the study period, prescription drug co-pays represented approximately 16% of the pharmaceutical expenditures.
Conclusions: Psychiatric comorbidity and substance use disorders, and nondependent abuse of drugs are highly prevalent among pathological gamblers. These disorders pose an economic burden to patients and healthcare payers.
(C) 2017 American Society of Addiction Medicine

Rodriguez-Monguio, R., Brand, E., & Volberg, R. (2017). The Economic Burden of Pathological Gambling and Co-occurring Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders. Journal of Addiction Medicine, Publish Ahead of Print. https://doi.org/10.1097/ADM.0000000000000363

 

A Longitudinal Study of the Temporal Relation Between Problem Gambling and Mental and Substance Use Disorders Among Young Adults – Open Access

Relatively little is known about the temporal relation between at-risk gambling or problem gambling (PG) and mental and substance use disorders (SUDs) in young adulthood. Our study aimed to examine whether past-year, at-risk, or PG is associated with incident mental disorders and SUDs (that is, depression, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive–compulsive disorder [OCD], or alcohol dependence) and illegal drug use, and whether past-year mental disorders and SUDs and illegal drug use is associated with incident at-risk or PG.

Source: Afifi, T. O., Nicholson, R., Martins, S. S., & Sareen, J. (2016). A Longitudinal Study of the Temporal Relation Between Problem Gambling and Mental and Substance Use Disorders Among Young Adults. The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 61(2), 102–111. http://doi.org/10.1177/0706743715625950