Simulations for addicts of gambling [open access article]

Blokland, Piet van. (July, 2018). Paper presented at the Tenth International Conference on Teaching Statistics (ICOTS10), Kyoto, Japan. Retrieved from https://iase-web.org/icots/10/proceedings/pdfs/ICOTS10_C110.pdf

Abstract: Gambling addiction is a serious problem in our societies. The gambling industry is a multi-billion industry with a lot of victims. Treatment for addiction has a high percentage of regression. We think that insight into the statistics involved, will help to strengthen the addicts ability to resist the temptations of gambling. Simulations are an easy way to explain variation and expectation. We describe a series of 3 lessons of 4 hours each about randomness, the gambler’s fallacy, slot machine and roulette to clarify these games in order to give better understanding. Attention is also paid to other aspects of the gambling. We tested these lessons with gamblers and gambling addicts. This approach may also be useful for public education. You can see the simulations at http://www.vustat.eu. Read full article

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Risk-taking and expenditure in digital roulette: Examining the impact of tailored dynamic information and warnings on gambling attitudes and behaviours [open access thesis]

McGivern, P. R. (2018). University of Derby [PhD Thesis].

Abstract: Digital gambling is the fastest growing form of gambling in the world (Reilly & Smith, 2013a). Technological advancements continually increase access to gambling, which has led to increased social acceptance and uptake (Dragicevic & Tsogas, 2014) with Roulette being among the most popular games played both online and on Electronic Gaming Machines. In response, gambling stakeholders have drawn on the structural characteristics of gambling platforms to develop and improve Responsible Gambling (RG) devices for casual gamblers. Many RG data-tracking systems employ intuitive ‘traffic-light’ metaphors that enable gamblers to monitor their gambling (e.g. Wood & Griffiths, 2008), though uptake of voluntary RG devices is low (Schellinck & Schrans, 2011), leading to calls for mandatory RG systems. Another area that has received considerable RG research focus involves the use of pop-up messages (Auer & Griffiths, 2014). Studies have examined various message content, such as correcting erroneous beliefs, encouraging self-appraisal, gambling cessation, and the provision of personalised feedback. To date, findings have been inconsistent but promising. A shift towards the use of personalised information has become the preferred RG strategy, though message content and timing/frequency requires improvement (Griffiths, 2014). Moreover, warning messages are unable to provide continuous feedback to gamblers. In response to this, and calls for a ‘risk meter’ to improve monitoring of gambling behaviours (Wiebe & Philander, 2013), this thesis tested the impact of a risk meter alongside improved pop-up warning messages as RG devices for within-session roulette gambling. Access thesis online from the University of Derby