Giving room to subjectivity in understanding and assessing problem gambling: A patient-centered approach focused on quality of life [open access article]

Background and aims: Problem gambling is characterized by high stigma and self-stigma, making relevant measurement of the burden of the disorder complex. The aim of our qualitative study was to describe health related quality of life (HRQOL) impacted by problem gambling from the patients’ perspective.

Methods: We conducted 6 focus groups with 25 current or lifetime at-risk problem gamblers to identify key domains of quality of life impacted by problem gambling. A content analysis from the focus groups data was conducted using Alceste© software, using descendant hierarchical classification analysis, to obtain stable classes and the significant presences of reduced forms. The class of interest, detailing the core of impacted quality of life, was described using a cluster analysis.

Results: Thematic content analysis identified three stable classes. Class 1 contained the interviewers’ speech. Class 3 was composed of the vocabulary related to gambling practice, games and gambling venues (casino, horse betting, etc.). Class 2 described the core of impact of gambling on quality of life and corresponded to 43% of the analyzed elementary context units. This analysis revealed seven key domains of impact of problem gambling: loneliness, financial pressure, relationships deterioration, feeling of incomprehension, preoccupation with gambling, negative emotions, and avoidance of helping relationships.

Conclusions: We identified, beyond objective damage, the subjective distress felt by problem gamblers over the course of the disorder and in the helping process, marked in particular by stigma and self-stigma. Four impacted HRQOL areas were new and gambling-specific: loneliness, feeling of incomprehension, avoidance of helping relationships, and preoccupation with gambling. These results support the relevance of developing, in a next step, a specific HRQOL scale in the context of gambling. Access full article

Reference: VBonfils, N.A., Grall-Bronnec, M., Caillon, J., Limosin, F., Benyamina, A., Aubin, H., & Luquiens, A. (2018). Giving room to subjectivity in understanding and assessing problem gambling: A patient-centered approach focused on quality of life. Journal of Behavioral Addictions. DOI:10.1556/2006.7.2018.137

Advertisements

Effects of CSR, responsible gambling, and negative social impacts on perceived benefits and quality of life in gaming communities [subscription access article]

Jungsun, K., & Choong-Ki, L. (2018). Tourism Economics. doi.org/10.1177/1354816618797199

Abstract
This study investigated (1) the positive effects of a company’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) and responsible gambling (RG) strategies on residents’ perceived benefits and their quality of life (QOL); (2) the effects of residents’ perceived negative social impacts from casino development on their perceived benefits and QOL; and (3) whether these relationships are invariant across two gaming communities. We collected data from 458 residents of two gaming communities in the Gangwon Province of South Korea. The findings showed that economic CSR had the strongest positive impact on residents’ perceived benefits, followed by philanthropic CSR and supplementary RG. These factors also had significant indirect effects on residents’ QOL via perceived benefits. The negative social impacts factor was found to negatively influence residents’ perceived benefits and QOL. These relationships were statistically invariant across the two gaming communities. The current study offers a legitimacy and stakeholder theory-driven approach to examine CSR, gaming communities’ perceived negative social impacts and benefits from casino development, and QOL. Article and access details

Gambling, Drinking and Quality of Life: Evidence from Macao and Australia

The investigation of the interface between psychological constructs, compulsive consumption of alcohol and pathological gambling is an important avenue for development of future initiatives in social marketing or prevention programs. This cross-cultural study attempts to bridge the gap in literature by providing an evaluation of the predictive ability of psychological variables such as gambling urge, gambling-related erroneous cognitions and comorbid alcohol consumption on pathological gambling behaviour and its impact on overall quality of life indicators…

Source: Loo, J. M. Y., Shi, Y., & Pu, X. (2015). Gambling, Drinking and Quality of Life: Evidence from Macao and Australia. Journal of Gambling Studies, 1–17. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10899-015-9569-3