Consumer perspectives of a multi-venue gambling self-exclusion program: A qualitative process analysis


Available online – from the Journal of Gambling Studies


Abstract: Self-exclusion is an important harm minimization strategy implemented by gambling operators to restrict a problem gambler’s access to gambling opportunities. Aspects of self-exclusion, including low uptake and non-compliance, limit the effectiveness of programs. Research that considers the consumer perspective is needed to enhance the perceived utility of self-exclusion in the target audience. Twenty interviews were conducted with current (n = 13) and former (n = 7) participants of a multi-venue self-exclusion program for land-based gaming machine venues in New South Wales, Australia. Participants were asked open-ended questions about their experiences and opinions of the program, including its strengths and weaknesses, and suggested improvements for future consumers. Overall, participants found self-exclusion beneficial. However, several shortcomings of the program were expressed, including lack of available public information and overly complicated registration processes. Participants lacked confidence in venues’ willingness and ability to identify non-compliant gamblers and highlighted the need for vastly improved detection systems. The quality of interactions with venue staff in relation to self-exclusion were mixed; counsellor support, however, was perceived as important from beginning to end of a self-exclusion period. Results suggest that gambling operators should increase marketing efforts to promote the availability and benefits of self-exclusion. Investigation of strategies to streamline registration processes and to augment detection systems with new technologies was supported. Venue staff may benefit from training in appropriate self-exclusion facilitation procedures. Gambling operators should aim to foster strong links between self-exclusion programs and professional gambling counselling services. Access full article

Reference: Pickering, D., Nong, Z., Gainsbury, S.M. & Blaszczynski, A. (2019). Consumer perspectives of a multi-venue gambling self-exclusion program: A qualitative process analysis. Journal of Gambling Studies, 41.

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Effects of prevention and harm reduction interventions on gambling behaviours and gambling related harm: An umbrella review [open access article]

Background
Harms related to gambling have been found not only to affect problem gamblers, but also to occur amongst low- and moderate-risk gamblers. This has resulted in calls for a public health approach to address a possible ‘prevention paradox’ in gambling related harm. The aim of this study was to evaluate the systematic review evidence base on the effects of prevention and harm reduction interventions on gambling behaviours, and gambling related harm. We also aimed to examine differential effects of interventions across socio-demographic groups. Access full article

Highlights

  • First umbrella review evaluating the effectives of prevention and harm reduction interventions on gambling behaviour.
  • Found evidence of 10 reviews reporting 55 unique primary studies.
  • Evidence relates mostly to pre-commitment/limit setting, self-exclusion, youth prevention programmes and messages/feedback.
  • Review-level evidence is poor, and no review reported differential effects of interventions across sociodemographic groups.

Naoimh McMahon, Katie Thomson, Eileen Kaner, & Clare Bambra. (2019). Addictive Behaviors, 90. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.11.048.

A research plan to define Canada’s first low-risk gambling guidelines [subscription access article]

Shawn R Currie, Low Risk Gambling Guidelines Scientific Working Group, Health Promotion International, day074, https://doi.org/10.1093/heapro/day074

Summary: From a public health perspective, gambling shares many of the same characteristics as alcohol. Notably, excessive gambling is associated with many physical and emotional health harms, including depression, suicidal ideation, substance use and addiction and greater utilization of health care resources. Gambling also demonstrates a similar ‘dose-response’ relationship as alcohol—the more one gambles, the greater the likelihood of harm. Using the same collaborative, evidence-informed approach that produced Canada’s Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking and Lower Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines, a research team is leading the development of the first national Low-Risk Gambling Guidelines (LRGGs) that will include quantitative thresholds for safe gambling. This paper describes the research methodology and the decision-making process for the project. The guidelines will be derived through secondary analyses of several large population datasets from Canada and other countries, including both cross-sectional and longitudinal data on over 50 000 adults. A scientific committee will pool the results and put forward recommendations for LRGGs to a nationally representative, multi-agency advisory committee for endorsement. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic attempt to generate a workable set of LRGGs from population data. Once validated, the guidelines inform public health policy and prevention initiatives and will be disseminated to addiction professionals, policy makers, regulators, communication experts and the gambling industry. The availability of the LRGGs will help the general public make well-informed decisions about their gambling activities and reduce the harms associated with gambling. Article details and access conditions

A study into the themes and typologies of binge gambling episodes [presentation available online]

By Verity Harris. Supervisors: Dr. Amanda Roberts and Dr Stephen Sharman.

Motive & methods: Research suggests to look into the patterns and relationships of binge gambling with other gambling types. Themes and typologies of problem gamblers binge episodes, to gain potential insight into binge gamblers episodes. Gordon Moody Association: intensive residential treatment programme in the UK for the most severely addicted. Access to 10 years worth of data. 52 interviews used, aged 21– 63, all males. Thematic Analysis: Chosen for it’s flexibility, simple use and ability to analyse latent level of data. Ethics has been collected and approved by SOPREC; Research discussing binge gamblers is in reference to Nower and Blaszczynski (2003). View presentation online

Supporting older people experiencing gambling-related harm: insights from practitioners [research presentation available online]

Stephanie Bramley, Caroline Norrie, Jill Manthorpe / Social Care Workforce Research Unit, King’s College London.

Overview of our research:
1. Improve the understanding of gambling-related harm for adults with health and social care needs.
2. Examine what key informants know about harmful gambling among adults with health and social care needs and their understanding of the risks to vulnerable adults arising from their own or others’ gambling participation.
3. Examine what practitioners know about harmful gambling among adults with health and social care needs, their understanding of the risks to vulnerable adults arising from their own or others’ gambling participation and their management of cases of gambling-related harm. View presentation online from King’s College London website

The relationship between player losses and gambling-related harm: evidence from nationally representative cross-sectional surveys in four countries

Background and Aims: Flaws in previous studies mean that findings of J-shaped risk curves for gambling should be disregarded. The current study aims to estimate the shape of risk curves for gambling losses and risk of gambling-related harm (a) for total gambling losses and (b) disaggregated by gambling activity.

Design: Four cross-sectional surveys.

Setting: Nationally representative surveys of adults in Australia (1999), Canada (2000), Finland (2011) and Norway (2002).

Participants: A total of 10 632 Australian adults, 3120 Canadian adults, 4484 people aged 15–74 years in Finland and 5235 people aged 15–74 years in Norway.

Measurements: Problem gambling risk was measured using the modified South Oaks Gambling Screen, the NORC DSM Screen for Gambling Problems and the Problem Gambling Severity Index…

Source: Markham, F., Young, M., & Doran, B. (2015). The relationship between player losses and gambling-related harm: evidence from nationally representative cross-sectional surveys in four countries: Player loss risk curves for gambling harms. Addiction, n/a–n/a. http://doi.org/10.1111/add.13178