Information technology usage as a moderator between disordered gambling, internet gaming addiction, and illusory control [subscription access article]

Abstract: This study tested the hypothesis as to whether the mode and time of information technology use—such as using various electronic and computing devices for gambling and collecting information related to gambling—can positively predict disordered gambling, with the effects of Internet gaming addiction and illusory control being taken into account.

A questionnaire set was administered to 677 Hong Kong secondary school students to assess their maladaptive gambling behavior, Internet gaming addiction, illusory control, and the habit of information technology use, such as the amount of time spent on watching television, browsing the Internet, and playing online gambling and non-gambling games. The results suggest that utilizing computing and electronic devices for gambling-related activities is positively indicative of disordered gambling, making use of information technology for work or study being a buffering factor.

Utilizing information technology for non-gambling activities—such as the durations of playing non-gambling games and making non-gambling purchases online—is not related to disordered gambling, albeit their positive correlations with Internet gaming addiction. Likewise, Internet gaming addiction has no association with using information technology devices for any gambling-related activities, except its very small correlation with playing online gambling games.

In addition, tablet computers may provide a convenient means for gambling activities and tend to be used by problem gamblers. It is recommended that intervention strategies targeted at secondary school students should address not only the amount of use but also the way they use information technology devices. Article details and access conditions

Yu, Calvin Kai-Ching & Fu, Wai. (2018). International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11469-018-0033-3

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Gambling Disorder in the DSM-5: Opportunities to Improve Diagnosis and Treatment Especially in Substance Use and Homeless Populations – Open Access

Rash, C. J., & Petry, N. M.

Purpose of review: This paper reviews recent research related to the revisions of the gambling disorder (GD) criteria, including the elimination of the illegal acts criterion and the lowered diagnostic threshold. Recent findings: Studies suggest that the removal of the illegal acts criterion has little impact in terms of prevalence or loss of diagnostic status among gamblers, especially when considered in combination with the lowered diagnostic threshold. Overall, prevalence rates will increase modestly with the lowered threshold in community samples of gamblers. However, increases in GD prevalence rates may be more notable in settings that serve individuals at higher risk for gambling problems (e.g., substance abuse treatment clinics and homeless persons). Summary: Changes to the GD diagnostic criteria may lead to increased recognition of gambling problems, particularly in settings that serve high-risk populations. These changes also may necessitate the training of more clinicians in the delivery of efficacious gambling treatments.

Rash, C. J., & Petry, N. M. (2016). Gambling Disorder in the DSM-5: Opportunities to Improve Diagnosis and Treatment Especially in Substance Use and Homeless Populations. Current Addiction Reports, 1–5. http://doi.org/10.1007/s40429-016-0112-0

DSM-5 criteria for gambling disorder: Underlying structure and applicability to specific groups of gamblers

Background and Aims

DSM-5 provides nine diagnostic criteria for gambling disorder. All criteria have a pre-assumed equal diagnostic impact and are applied to all individuals and groups in an equal manner. The aims of the study are to analyse the structure underlying the diagnosis and to assess whether DSM-5 is equally applicable to different groups of gamblers.

Methods

Data from the 2009 German Epidemiological Survey of Substance Abuse and from a study on slot machine gamblers were used. Item Response Theory analysis was applied to estimate discrimination and severity parameters of the criteria. With the use of Differential Item Functioning analysis, potential criterion biases were analysed. We analysed data from 107 participants from the general population sample and 376 participants from the slot machine gamblers’ sample who answered a 19-item diagnostic questionnaire based on the DSM criteria for gambling disorder.

Source: Sleczka, P., Braun, B., Piontek, D., Bühringer, G., & Kraus, L. (2015). DSM-5 criteria for gambling disorder: Underlying structure and applicability to specific groups of gamblers. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 4(4), 226–235.

Reliability, Validity, and Classification Accuracy of the DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria for Gambling Disorder and Comparison to DSM-IV

Full text available

The DSM-5 was published in 2013 and it included two substantive revisions for gambling disorder (GD). These changes are the reduction in the threshold from five to four criteria and elimination of the illegal activities criterion. The purpose of this study was to twofold. First, to assess the reliability, validity and classification accuracy of the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for GD. Second, to compare the DSM-5–DSM-IV on reliability, validity, and classification accuracy, including an examination of the effect of the elimination of the illegal acts criterion on diagnostic accuracy…

Source: Stinchfield, R., McCready, J., Turner, N. E., Jimenez-Murcia, S., Petry, N. M., Grant, J., … Winters, K. C. (2015). Reliability, Validity, and Classification Accuracy of the DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria for Gambling Disorder and Comparison to DSM-IV. Journal of Gambling Studies, 1–18.

Associations Between Gambling Games and Gambling Problems: Whole Games Compared with Temporal, Skill Characteristics, and Other Structural Characteristics

Goodie, A. S. (2015). Associations Between Gambling Games and Gambling Problems: Whole Games Compared with Temporal, Skill Characteristics, and Other Structural Characteristics. Current Addiction Reports, 1–5. http://doi.org/10.1007/s40429-015-0068-5

Full text available

Research and commentary have been addressed to distinctions regarding problem gambling on the basis of differences in the types of gambling in which individuals engage, such as symptom severity, co-occurring conditions, psychological correlates, and demographic differences. Some progress has been made at the level of the whole game. For example, electronic gaming machine users are more often female and more prone to depressive disorders as well as gambling disorder. Players of other games, such as poker and sports betting, are typically male and prone to substance use disorders. A promising recent trend, however, is to create taxonomies to analyze relevant structural game characteristics that predict gambling problems in a theoretically grounded way…