Attraction or Distraction? Corporate Social Responsibility in Macao’s Gambling Industry

This paper attempts to investigate how and why organisations in Macao’s gambling industry engage in corporate social responsibility (CSR). It is based on an in-depth investigation of Macao’s gambling industry with 49 semi-structured interviews, conducted in 2011. We found that firms within the industry were emphasising pragmatic legitimacy based on both economic and non-economic contributions, in order to project positive images of the industry, while glossing over two domains of adverse externalities: problem gambling among visitors, and the pollution and despoliation of the environment…

Source: Leung, T. C. H., & Snell, R. S. (2015). Attraction or Distraction? Corporate Social Responsibility in Macao’s Gambling Industry. Journal of Business Ethics, 1–22. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-015-2890-z

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Gender Differences in Self-Conscious Emotions and Motivation to Quit Gambling

Considerable gender differences have been previously noted in the prevalence, etiology, and clinical features of problem gambling. While differences in affective states between men and women in particular, may explain differential experiences in the process of gambling, the role of affect in motivations for quitting gambling and recovery has not been thoroughly explored. The aim of this study was to examine gender differences within a sample of problem gamblers motivated to quit with or without formal treatment, and further, to explore the interactions between gender, shame and guilt-proneness, and autonomous versus controlled reasons for change. Motivation for change and self-conscious emotional traits were analyzed for 207 adult problem gamblers with an interest in quitting or reducing their gambling (96.6 % not receiving treatment)…

Source: Kushnir, V., Godinho, A., Hodgins, D. C., Hendershot, C. S., & Cunningham, J. A. (2015). Gender Differences in Self-Conscious Emotions and Motivation to Quit Gambling. Journal of Gambling Studies, 1–15. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10899-015-9574-6

Marital Status and Problem Gambling Among Australian Older Adults: The Mediating Role of Loneliness

Problem gambling rates in older adults have risen dramatically in recent years and require further investigation. Limited available research has suggested that social needs may motivate gambling and hence problem gambling in older adults. Un-partnered older adults may be at greater risk of problem gambling than those with a partner. The current study explored whether loneliness mediated the marital status–problem gambling relationship, and whether gender moderated the mediation model. It was hypothesised that the relationship between being un-partnered and higher levels of loneliness would be stronger for older men than older women…

Source: Botterill, E., Gill, P. R., McLaren, S., & Gomez, R. (2015). Marital Status and Problem Gambling Among Australian Older Adults: The Mediating Role of Loneliness. Journal of Gambling Studies, 1–12. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10899-015-9575-5

Problem Gambling : A Guide for Parents

The Problem Gambling Institute of Ontario has recently published a guide for parents who are concerend about the effects of problem gambling on their children.

From their website:

Most families faced with problem gambling want to know how they can regain control of their lives. We hope this section will help you:

  • Understand how gambling may affect your family
  • Learn how to help someone with a gambling problem
  • Find ways to get your family life back in order
  • Deal with money issues
  • Learn how counselling can help you and your family
  • Find resources that have helped other families

Your life may feel out of control right now. But with help, your family can deal with and get over problems caused by gambling. People with gambling problems do recover, and their families do heal. Your family can be one of them. By reading this information on ProblemGambling.ca, you have taken an important first step.

Source: ProblemGambling | Information and Support For Families

Social casino gaming and adolescents: Should we be concerned and is regulation in sight?

While gambling has traditionally been viewed as an adult activity, there is a growing body of research that a significant number of adolescents are not only gambling but are experiencing gambling related problems. As ease of access via Internet wagering has increased, so too have some of the concomitant problems. Social casino gambling, often thought of gambling without risking one’s money through the use of virtual currency, has become increasingly popular. The current review examines whether we should be concerned over its widespread use and whether such social games should be regulated.

Source: Derevensky, J. L., & Gainsbury, S. M. (n.d.). Social casino gaming and adolescents: Should we be concerned and is regulation in sight? International Journal of Law and Psychiatry. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijlp.2015.08.025

Significant life events and social connectedness in Australian women’s gambling experiences

Full text available via direct link to PDF below.

AIM – The aim is to examine significant life events and social connections that encourage some women to gamble. Specifically, how do these events and connections described as important for women who develop gambling-related problems differ for women who remain recreational gamblers? DESIGN – 20 women who were electronic gaming machine (EGMs, poker machines, slots) players were interviewed using a brief interview guide. They also completed the nine question Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI) from the Canadian Problem Gambling Index CPGI)…

Source: Nuske, E. M., Holdsworth, L., & Breen, H. (2015). Significant life events and social connectedness in Australian women’s gambling experiences. Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 32, 5–6.

Developing and validating a scale to measure the enacted and felt stigma of gambling

Full text available

This research project aimed to explore the stigma associated with problem gambling. The study designed and tested the following two measures of stigma for use in future research: The Gambling Perceived Stigma Scale measures perceived stigma against problem gamblers (or recreational gamblers, if desired). The Gambling Experienced Stigma Scale measures experiences of stigma associated with gambling behaviours. The study found both scales have strong psychometric properties and are suitable for use in future research, although further validation of the Gambling Experienced Stigma Scale is required…

Source: Donaldson, P., Best, T., Langham, M. E., Browne, M., & Oorloff, M. A. (2015). Developing and validating a scale to measure the enacted and felt stigma of gambling. Victoria, Australia: Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation.