Journal of Gambling Issues, No 36

The Journal of Gambling Issues has released a new issue covering a variety of topics, so rather than list them individually you can peruse the table of contents below. All JGI articles are open access.

 

Table of Contents

Original Article

What is the harm? Applying a public health methodology to measure the impact of gambling problems and harm on quality of life.

Matthew Browne, Vijay Rawat, Nancy Greer, Erika Langham, Matthew Rockloff, Christine Hanley

http://jgi.camh.net/index.php/jgi/article/view/3987/4151

Built-in bad luck: Evidence of near-miss outcomes by design in scratch cards

Madison Stange, Dan G. Brown, Kevin Harrigan, Michael Dixon

http://jgi.camh.net/index.php/jgi/article/view/3977/4150

An Analysis of Media Representation of the Australian Electronic Gaming Machine Industry

June St Clair Buchanan, Michael L. Jones, Ken Tann

http://jgi.camh.net/index.php/jgi/article/view/3979/4153

Exploring the Relationship Between Body Mass Index, Obesity, and Gambling Level Across Different Gambling Types

Desmond Lam, Man Mok

http://jgi.camh.net/index.php/jgi/article/view/3983/4154

Evaluation of a School-Based Gambling Prevention Program for Adolescents: Efficacy of Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour

Renée A. St-Pierre, Jeffrey L. Derevensky, Caroline E. Temcheff, Rina Gupta, Alexa Martin-Story

http://jgi.camh.net/index.php/jgi/article/view/3984/4158

The Social Construction of the Pathological Gambler’s Identity and Its Relationship With Social Adaptation: Narratives From Members of Italian Gambling Anonymous and Gam-Anon Family Groups

Claudia Venuleo, Tiziana Marinaci

http://jgi.camh.net/index.php/jgi/article/view/3985/4159

Win or Lose: Negotiating meaning of time and money within three gambling settings

Chantal Robillard, Sylvia Kairouz, Eva Monson

http://jgi.camh.net/index.php/jgi/article/view/3980/4160

On the Feasibility of In-Venue Observations of Electronic Gaming Machine Gamblers and Game Characteristics

Jason Landon, Katie Palmer du Preez, Maria Bellringer, Max Abbott, Amanda Roberts

http://jgi.camh.net/index.php/jgi/article/view/3982/4161

Closing a Treatment Gap in Ontario: Pilot of a Tutorial Workbook for Women Gamblers

Roberta Boughton, Farah Jindani, Nigel E. Turner

http://jgi.camh.net/index.php/jgi/article/view/3986/4162

Literature Review

Internet Gambling: A Critical Review of Behavioural Tracking Research

Bernardo T. Chagas, Jorge F. S. Gomes

http://jgi.camh.net/index.php/jgi/article/view/3987/4151

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Effectiveness of two web-based cognitive bias modification interventions targeting approach and attentional bias in gambling problems: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial (open access)

By Boffo, M., Willemen, R., Pronk, T., Wiers, R. W., & Dom, G.

Abstract: Disordered gamblers have phenotypical and pathological similarities to those with substance use disorders (SUD), including exaggerated automatic cognitive processing of motivationally salient gambling cues in the environment (i.e., attentional and approach bias). Cognitive bias modification (CBM) is a family of computerised interventions that have proved effective in successfully re-training these automatic cognitive biases in SUD. CBM interventions can, in principle, be administered online, thus showing potential of being a low-cost, low-threshold addition to conventional treatments. This paper presents the design of a pilot randomised controlled trial exploring the effectiveness of two web-based CBM interventions targeting attentional and approach bias towards gambling cues in a sample of Dutch and Belgian problematic and pathological gamblers.

Boffo, M., Willemen, R., Pronk, T., Wiers, R. W., & Dom, G. (2017). Effectiveness of two web-based cognitive bias modification interventions targeting approach and attentional bias in gambling problems: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial. Trials, 18, 452. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13063-017-2190-2

 

Internet Gambling: A Critical Review of Behavioural Tracking Research (full text)

By Chagas, B. T., & Gomes, J. F. S.

Abstract: This paper reviews and analyzes studies that are focused on Internet gambling with the use of behavioural tracking and big data to identify gambling behaviour. The behaviour of gamblers has been extensively studied and much has been published on the subject. The vast majority of research has relied on self-reported gambling behaviour or case study research. With the advent of the Internet, however, it has become possible for researchers to remotely study the real behaviour of gamblers. The goal has been to empirically describe playing behaviour in several conditions and contexts. Existing research, conducted since the 2000s, focuses on several forms of gambling such as sports betting, casino, poker, and lottery, but there is still only a concise body of research on gambling behaviour with the use of Internet gambling tracking data. Most studies are based on the same databases, meaning that a few companies and websites were the basis for most of the research produced so far. It is important to explore new sources of information, methodologies, and approaches to enrich discussion and contribute to a better understanding of this field. The empirical analysis of gambling behaviour with the use of tracking data was found to greatly contribute to the understanding of player behaviour, despite existing limitations and problems. Considering that Internet gambling behavioural tracking is still a fairly recent phenomenon, much can still be done to further develop this field of research.

Chagas, B. T., & Gomes, J. F. S. (2017). Internet Gambling: A Critical Review of Behavioural Tracking Research. Journal of Gambling Issues, 0(36). https://doi.org/10.4309/jgi.v0i36.3987

 

Effects of a workplace prevention programme for problem gambling: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial (full text)

By Rafi, J., Ivanova, E., Rozental, A., & Carlbring, P.

Abstract: Introduction Despite being considered a public health problem, no prevention programme for problem gambling in workplace settings has been scientifically evaluated. This study aims to fill a critical gap in the field of problem gambling by implementing and evaluating a large-scale prevention programme in organisations.
Methods and analysis Ten organisations, with a total of n=549 managers and n=8572 employees, will be randomised to either receiving a prevention programme or to a waitlist control condition. Measurements will be collected at the baseline and 3, 12 and 24 months after intervention. The primary outcome of interest is the managers’ inclination to act when worried or suspicious about an employee’s problem gambling or other harmful use. Additional outcomes of interest include the Problem Gambling Severity Index and gambling habits in both managers and employees. Furthermore, qualitative analyses of the responses from semistructured interviews with managers will be performed.
Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the regional ethics board of Stockholm, Sweden, and it will contribute to the body of knowledge concerning prevention of problem gambling. The findings will be published in peer-reviewed, open-access journals.

Rafi, J., Ivanova, E., Rozental, A., & Carlbring, P. (2017). Effects of a workplace prevention programme for problem gambling: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial. BMJ Open, 7(9), e015963. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-015963

 

Identifying the Relationship Between Mental Health Symptoms, Problem Behaviors and Gambling Among Adolescents

By Richard, J., & Derevensky, J.

Abstract: Background: Adolescence represents a significant social and psychological developmental period which can lead to the experimentation with multiple highrisk behaviours. Although associations with problem gambling in youth have been established in the research literature, there is lack of consistency in the results and measures used to assess these constructs while considering the impact of gender and age. The current study examined the relationship between mental health symptoms (anxiety, depression), problem behaviours (aggression, delinquency) and gambling among high-school youth.

Method: Questionnaire responses were collected from 6,818 junior and senior high-school students in a mid-western U.S. community.

Results: Statistical analyses revealed that all mental health symptoms and problem behaviors were related to an increase in gambling frequency and risk for a gambling problem. Of note, both aggressive and delinquent/antisocial problems held the highest risk for gambling problems compared to anxiety and depressive problems. Significant differences were also observed in terms of gender and age.

Conclusion: This study contributes to our understanding of mental health issues and risky behaviors among adolescents.

Richard, J., & Derevensky, J. (2017). Identifying the Relationship Between Mental Health Symptoms, Problem Behaviors and Gambling Among Adolescents. Annals of Behavioural Science, 03(02). https://doi.org/10.21767/2471-7975.100030