Problem Gambling and Family Violence in Help-Seeking Populations: Co-occurrence, Impact and Coping (full text)

By Maria Bellringer, Katie Palmer du Preez, Janet Pearson, Nick Garrett, Jane Koziol-McLain, Denise Wilson, Max Abbott.

Four hundred and fifty-four clients of problem gambling treatment services took part in a short survey on gambling and family/whānau violence and abuse. There were 370 gamblers and 84 affected others (e.g. partners, other family members and friends). The survey took place from June 2013 to March 2015.

The purpose of the research was to identify the level of family/whānau violence and abuse in people seeking help for problem gambling, and to increase our understanding of these issues. A wide definition of family/whānau violence was used, which included physical violence and coercive control (most often thought of as violence), as well as psychological and emotional abuse (more often thought of as conflict), and sexual abuse.

Summary continues here

Bellringer, Maria, Katie Palmer du Preez, Janet Pearson, Nick Garrett, Jane Koziol-McLain, Denise Wilson, and Max Abbott. “Problem Gambling and Family Violence in Help-Seeking Populations: Co-Occurrence, Impact and Coping.” Wellington: Ministry of Health, November 4, 2016.

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