The Public Stigma of Problem Gambling: Its Nature and Relative Intensity Compared to Other Health Conditions

Problem gambling attracts considerable public stigma, with deleterious effects on mental health and use of healthcare services amongst those affected. However, no research has examined the extent of stigma towards problem gambling within the general population. This study aimed to examine the stigma-related dimensions of problem gambling as perceived by the general public compared to other health conditions, and determine whether the publicly perceived dimensions of problem gambling predict its stigmatisation. A sample of 2000 Australian adults was surveyed, weighted to be representative of the state population by gender, age and location. Based on vignettes, the online survey measured perceived origin, peril, concealability, course and disruptiveness of problem gambling and four other health conditions, and desired social distance from each…

Source: Ra, S.-P., Ce, T., Jl, D., & R, G. (2015). Theory of Planned Behavior in School-Based Adolescent Problem Gambling Prevention: A Conceptual Framework. The Journal of Primary Prevention.

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Theory of Planned Behavior in School-Based Adolescent Problem Gambling Prevention: A Conceptual Framework

Given its serious implications for psychological and socio-emotional health, the prevention of problem gambling among adolescents is increasingly acknowledged as an area requiring attention. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) is a well-established model of behavior change that has been studied in the development and evaluation of primary preventive interventions aimed at modifying cognitions and behavior. However, the utility of the TPB has yet to be explored as a framework for the development of adolescent problem gambling prevention initiatives. This paper first examines the existing empirical literature addressing the effectiveness of school-based primary prevention programs for adolescent gambling…

Source: Ra, S.-P., Ce, T., Jl, D., & R, G. (2015). Theory of Planned Behavior in School-Based Adolescent Problem Gambling Prevention: A Conceptual Framework. The Journal of Primary Prevention.

Responsible Gambling: Conceptual Considerations

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The objective of this article is to generate greater conceptual clarity about the expression ‘‘responsible gambling,’’ and especially to disentangle moral claims from empirical ones. It is argued that adopted moral perspectives, as opposed to empirical evidence, more often act to influence current policies. Accordingly, it is important to increase awareness of the underlying perspectives being applied by those advocating for specific types of responsible gambling policies—that is, prohibitionist, restrictive, or libertarian. We offer this article with the hope that this will contribute to dissolving some obstacles in the way of more coherent public policy in relation to gambling generally and, especially, to addictive or otherwise disordered gambling. This article should facilitate more effective practices that can minimize the harms caused by excessive gambling…

Source: Collins, P., Blaszczynski, A., Ladouceur, R., Howard, Shaffer, J., Fong, D., & Venisse, J.-L. (2015). Responsible Gambling: Conceptual Considerations. Gaming Law Review and Economics, 19(8), 594–599. http://doi.org/10.1089/glre.2015.1985

Exploring the Gray Areas: Senior Gamblers’ Perceptions Of What Is and What Isn’t Gambling

The basis of any health promotion or harm minimization initiative is effective engagement of the target audience. However, because “gambling” can be interpreted in a variety of ways, service providers, such as community educators and clinical practitioners, cannot always assume a shared understanding of the meaning of gambling with their clients. This paper aims to help reduce such discrepancies by highlighting conditions in which gambling is usually viewed as gambling by those engaged in the behavior and by describing scenarios that may be more ambiguous. Such awareness can help service providers to maximize engagement efforts while minimizing the stigma typically associated with gambling…

Source: Tira, C., & Jackson, A. C. (2015). Exploring the Gray Areas: Senior Gamblers’ Perceptions Of What Is and What Isn’t Gambling. Journal of Gambling Issues.

Shaping pathways to gambling consumption? An analysis of the promotion of gambling and non-gambling activities from gambling venues

Background: In Australia, venues which provide gambling activities also provide activities that are utilised by families and children. However, there has been limited theoretical or empirical discussion about whether engagement with non-gambling activities may play a role in shaping pathways to current or future engagement in gambling within these environments. We examined marketing tactics for non-gambling and gambling activities in Clubs. Using this data, we propose a conceptual model to test the role of non-gambling activities within gambling environments in shaping gambling attitudes and consumption intentions.

Methods: This study used a mixed method interpretive content analysis to review the marketing activities on the websites of a sample of 65 registered Clubs in New South Wales, Australia. We identified the extent and nature of techniques used to market gambling and non-gambling activities, particularly non-gambling activities directed towards families and children…

Source: Bestman, A., Thomas, S., Randle, M., Pitt, H., Daube, M., & Pettigrew, S. (2015). Shaping pathways to gambling consumption? An analysis of the promotion of gambling and non-gambling activities from gambling venues. Addiction Research & Theory, 0(0), 1–11.

Attraction or Distraction? Corporate Social Responsibility in Macao’s Gambling Industry

This paper attempts to investigate how and why organisations in Macao’s gambling industry engage in corporate social responsibility (CSR). It is based on an in-depth investigation of Macao’s gambling industry with 49 semi-structured interviews, conducted in 2011. We found that firms within the industry were emphasising pragmatic legitimacy based on both economic and non-economic contributions, in order to project positive images of the industry, while glossing over two domains of adverse externalities: problem gambling among visitors, and the pollution and despoliation of the environment…

Source: Leung, T. C. H., & Snell, R. S. (2015). Attraction or Distraction? Corporate Social Responsibility in Macao’s Gambling Industry. Journal of Business Ethics, 1–22. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-015-2890-z

Gender Differences in Self-Conscious Emotions and Motivation to Quit Gambling

Considerable gender differences have been previously noted in the prevalence, etiology, and clinical features of problem gambling. While differences in affective states between men and women in particular, may explain differential experiences in the process of gambling, the role of affect in motivations for quitting gambling and recovery has not been thoroughly explored. The aim of this study was to examine gender differences within a sample of problem gamblers motivated to quit with or without formal treatment, and further, to explore the interactions between gender, shame and guilt-proneness, and autonomous versus controlled reasons for change. Motivation for change and self-conscious emotional traits were analyzed for 207 adult problem gamblers with an interest in quitting or reducing their gambling (96.6 % not receiving treatment)…

Source: Kushnir, V., Godinho, A., Hodgins, D. C., Hendershot, C. S., & Cunningham, J. A. (2015). Gender Differences in Self-Conscious Emotions and Motivation to Quit Gambling. Journal of Gambling Studies, 1–15. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10899-015-9574-6