Using Gambling Simulators to Foster Awareness About Gambling Risks: A Focus on Emotions

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Stemming from an interest in developing suitable didactical tasks to prevent gambling abuse during the school years, this article explores the use of an Android app that simulates the outcomes of a well-known Italian instant lottery. Some features that characterize the phenomenon of gambling abuse are sketchily recalled, the Android app is presented and an example from a classroom task is discussed. We conclude that the simulator contributes to developing statistical literacy, as traditional random generators do, and also exploits emotional reactions, such as shock, which allow curiosity to emerge and pave the way towards deeper understanding.

Source: Andrà, C., Parolini, N., & Verani, M. (2015). Using Gambling Simulators to Foster Awareness About Gambling Risks: A Focus on Emotions. Digital Experiences in Mathematics Education, 1–20. http://doi.org/10.1007/s40751-015-0005-1

National estimates of Australian gambling prevalence: findings from a dual-frame omnibus survey

The increase in mobile telephone only households may be a source of bias for traditional landline gambling prevalence surveys. Aims were to: 1) identify Australian gambling participation and problem gambling prevalence using a dual-frame (50% landline and 50% mobile telephone) computer assisted telephone interviewing methodology; 2) explore the predictors of sample frame and telephone status; and 3) explore the degree to which sample frame and telephone status moderate the relationships between respondent characteristics and problem gambling.

Source: Dowling, N. A., Youssef, G. J., Jackson, A. C., Pennay, D. W., Francis, K. L., Pennay, A., & Lubman, D. I. (2015). National estimates of Australian gambling prevalence: findings from a dual-frame omnibus survey. Addiction, n/a–n/a. http://doi.org/10.1111/add.13176

Testing the Validity of a Cognitive Behavioral Model for Gambling Behavior

Currently, cognitive behavioral therapies appear to be one of the most studied treatments for gambling problems and studies show it is effective in treating gambling problems. However, cognitive behavior models have not been widely tested using statistical means. Thus, the aim of this study was to test the validity of the pathways postulated in the cognitive behavioral theory of gambling behavior using structural equation modeling (AMOS 20). Several questionnaires assessing a range of gambling specific variables (e.g., gambling urges, cognitions and behaviors) and gambling correlates (e.g., psychological states, and coping styles) were distributed to 969 participants from the community…

Source: Raylu, N., Oei, T. P. S., Loo, J. M. Y., & Tsai, J.-S. (2015). Testing the Validity of a Cognitive Behavioral Model for Gambling Behavior. Journal of Gambling Studies / Co-Sponsored by the National Council on Problem Gambling and Institute for the Study of Gambling and Commercial Gaming. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10899-015-9567-5

Australasian Epidemiologist – The big gamble: The need for a comprehensive research approach to understanding the causes and consequences of gambling harm in Australia

Problem gambling is now recognised as a major public health issue, with some gambling products posing significant burdens for individuals, families and communities. While gambling has attracted significant political and media attention, governments have been largely unwilling to implement a comprehensive approach to gambling reform. This article reviews the evidence base associated with gambling harm and advocates for a shift in focus away from initiatives that focus on responsible gambling, towards an approach that recognises the mutual obligation between industry, individuals, governments and the general community to engage in practices that prevent the development of gambling-related harm.

Source: Thomas, S. L., & Thomas, S. D. (2015). The big gamble: The need for a comprehensive research approach to understanding the causes and consequences of gambling harm in Australia. Australasian Epidemiologist, 22(1), 39.

Wagering the future: Cognitive distortions, impulsivity, delay discounting, and time perspective in adolescent gambling

This study investigated the relationship of cognitive distortions, self-reported impulsivity, delay discounting, and time perspective to gambling severity in Italian adolescents. One thousand and thirty high school students were administered the South Oaks Gambling Screen Revised for Adolescents (SOGS-RA), the Gambling Related Cognitions Scale (GRCS), the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11), the Monetary Choice Questionnaire (MCQ), and the Consideration of Future Consequences Scale (CFC-14). A factor analysis, used to evaluate common factors assessed by the different measures, revealed a three-factor structure of Cognitive distortions, Impulsive present orientation, and Delay discounting…

Source: Cosenza, M., & Nigro, G. (2015). Wagering the future: Cognitive distortions, impulsivity, delay discounting, and time perspective in adolescent gambling. Journal of Adolescence, 45, 56–66. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2015.08.015

Demographic, Behavioural and Normative Risk Factors for Gambling Problems Amongst Sports Bettors

Sports betting is growing exponentially, is heavily marketed and successfully targets young adult males. Associated gambling problems are increasing. Therefore, understanding risk factors for problem gambling amongst sports bettors is an increasingly important area of research to inform the appropriate design and targeting of public health and treatment interventions. This study aimed to identify demographic, behavioural and normative risk factors for gambling problems amongst sports bettors…

Source: Hing, N., Russell, A. M. T., Vitartas, P., & Lamont, M. (2015). Demographic, Behavioural and Normative Risk Factors for Gambling Problems Amongst Sports Bettors. Journal of Gambling Studies, 1–17. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10899-015-9571-9

“Toward a Sociological Analysis of Pathological Gambling” : Journal of Sociology and Social Work

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The academic study of gambling began in the United States in the 1950s with an emphasis on the psychoanalytical approach – gambling was considered a mental illness, a compulsion. In the 960s and 1970s, sociologists began to look at gambling as a social problem, but this approach did not gain much traction in changing the psychoanalytical view of gambling’s acceptance by the mental health community as well as by the general public. In the ensuing decades, the study of gambling behavior has shifted to a genetic approach, with genes being held responsible for what is now referred to as pathological gambling (PG). This change is reflected in the most recent iteration of the American Psychiatric Association’s bible, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DMS-5), which places PG within the category of “Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders.” In this article, an alternative viewing of gambling is offered, one that sees gambling as more of a cultural phenomenon, a result of capitalism’s emphasis on competition, and blaming the victim for not succeeding, than as an addiction.

Source: Scimecca, J. A. (2015). Toward a Sociological Analysis of Pathological Gambling. Journal of Sociology and Social Work, 3(1). http://doi.org/10.15640/jssw.v3n1a1

Gender Differences Among Helpline Callers: Prospective Study of Gambling and Psychosocial Outcomes

Despite the increasing amount of empirical research on gambling helplines (e.g., characteristics, effectiveness), little is known about gender differences on treatment outcomes following contact. The present research addresses this gap in the literature via secondary analysis of an uncontrolled outcome study of New Zealand’s gambling helpline (N = 150). To this end, the present research had three aims; (a) explore gender differences (e.g., demographics, co-morbidities, gambling variables) among helpline callers using psychometrically robust measures, (b) assess whether gender predicts treatment utilization following contact and (c) assess whether systematic gender differences exist on gambling and psychosocial outcomes at 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-ups. The results revealed that at baseline, women compared to men, described greater problem severity and shorter problem duration, and were more likely to report electronic gaming machines as their most problematic form of gambling…

Source: Kim, H. S., Hodgins, D. C., Bellringer, M., & Abbott, M. (2015). Gender Differences Among Helpline Callers: Prospective Study of Gambling and Psychosocial Outcomes. Journal of Gambling Studies, 1–19. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10899-015-9572-8

Gambling, Drinking and Quality of Life: Evidence from Macao and Australia

The investigation of the interface between psychological constructs, compulsive consumption of alcohol and pathological gambling is an important avenue for development of future initiatives in social marketing or prevention programs. This cross-cultural study attempts to bridge the gap in literature by providing an evaluation of the predictive ability of psychological variables such as gambling urge, gambling-related erroneous cognitions and comorbid alcohol consumption on pathological gambling behaviour and its impact on overall quality of life indicators…

Source: Loo, J. M. Y., Shi, Y., & Pu, X. (2015). Gambling, Drinking and Quality of Life: Evidence from Macao and Australia. Journal of Gambling Studies, 1–17. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10899-015-9569-3

Gambling attitudes associated with problem gambling : the cohort effect of baby boomers

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The current study sought to examine the effects of gambling attitudes and beliefs on problem gambling behaviour across three cohorts, namely Generation X, Baby Boomers, and the Silent Generation. Individuals from Northern and Southern Ontario completed either an online or paper version of a questionnaire that included the Canadian Problem Gambling Index (CPGI) and South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS) to measure problem gambling, the Gambling Attitudes Scales (GAS) to measure gambling attitudes, and the Gambling Attitudes and Beliefs Survey (GABS), Gamblers’ Beliefs Questionnaire (GBQ), and Gambling Related Cognitions Scale (GRCS) to measure gambling beliefs. A sample of 308 participants consisted of 101 individuals from Generation X, 139 from the Baby Boom cohort, and 68 from the Silent Generation. Analyses focused on differences between Baby Boomers and their surrounding cohorts, but especially on differences between the older two cohorts…

Tanner, J. (2015, August 25). Gambling attitudes associated with problem gambling : the cohort effect of baby boomers (Thesis). Retrieved from http://thesis.lakeheadu.ca:8080/handle/2453/673